contemporary art

I remember having a heated conversation one time (or one too many times) with an anti-currency, anti-government… sort of anti-order in general, friend of mine. (I’m getting a migraine just thinking about our conversations). Anyway, our little chat was centered around the concept of currency. I argued that even if the U.S. dollar was diminished, citizens would quickly establish a new form of currency in order to exchange goods and services. He disagreed and claimed that currency was entirely unnecessary – that civilization could function without any sort of exchange. I don’t know about that. I think those living in his Utopian “civilization” would have to be very open and trusting, maybe like Burning Man-goers. But I don’t think that way of living could last very long. People would start coming down from their happy drugs and bogarting the town’s supply of chicken nuggets and NOT sharing. I know I would.

That being said, I don’t think a civilization could run smoothly solely on a bartering system, but I DO think that a mixture of the two can work. So, we come back to reality. In the world of Etsy, bartering is very much a possibility AND totally awesome.

Pascalle Ballard (aka fabricalchemist) contacted me on Etsy and wanted to exchange something from her shop for a pair of custom red slippers (seen above). I didn’t see anything in her shop that went with the decor in my room, so I asked her if I could possibly request a custom illustration… and she said yes!

The Wasp Duchess, by Pascalle Ballard (5.5″ x 8″)

And OH MY GOD it came out amazing. I can’t wait to frame it. I asked her to draw something Gothic Lolita inspired, using yellow and a dash of lace and what she created was even cooler than I had imagined. The result is this amazing piece. What a wonderful way to collect art! Be sure to check out her shop for her many unique and beautiful pieces.

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Howl by Ryan Martin (Oil on canvas)

Happening now through November 27, 2010, you too can check out Ryan Martin’s new work at Mark Wolfe Contemporary (1 Sutter St, Suite 300, San Francisco, CA 94104)… and please do. You will thank me later, or Ryan, rather. [click to continue…]

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… ok, maybe not EVER, but it was pretty sweet. Why? Well, let me tell you.

1.) I bought my plane ticket to London today! (THE CROWD GOES WILD)

2.) My awesome cousin Ryan Martin had his solo exhibit opening this evening and it was even MORE amazing than I was expecting. So fun to see the neat space at Mark Wolfe Contemporary and see family. I’ll write much more about the show soon, but for now you can click here for more info.

3.) Lastly, I just became a pro bono consultant for the Taproot Foundation. They do amazing things for amazing organizations and I’m really excited to be a consultant and do my part! It’s been a while since I’ve done any volunteer work, so it’s about time I did something about it. Yay!

Video from Taproot Founder Aaron Hurst from Aaron Hurst on Vimeo.

I hope you all had a dandy Thursday, and caught the live 30 Rock episode! Whaddup, Pacific Time!

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Change Clothes and Go

by tatiana on April 6, 2010

Photo Credit: Bubble Girl by Banksy

Lately, I’ve found myself to be in somewhat of a strange head space. I attribute this to not having much time to do absolutely nothing… which, honestly, I rarely do because I don’t like being “bored”, but sometimes it’s really important. As my friend Frank N. would say, “it’s all a part of the creative process.” I need to remember this. [click to continue…]

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My Kind of Valentine's Day Greeting

by tatiana on February 12, 2010

Taken at Blush Wine Bar on Castro St. with my iPhone

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Sunday Inspiration: “Spread yo wings, girl!”

by tatiana on November 9, 2009

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Miss Chicago and the California Girls, 1971
Poster produced by the Feminist Art Program, Fresno State College, Calif.
(Scanned from The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s, History and Impact)

The above poster is from the beginning of the Feminist Art Program which was established by Judy Chicago when she accepted a teaching position at Fresno State. Chicago chose Fresno State because it was so isolated from the art world. She also decided that the program should operate off campus so her students could function in a space free from patriarchy. Chicago’s motivation was to help her students find a sense of self in their work, feel comfortable to create art, be open to formulate their own ideas and feel understood; all things that she felt she did not receive from her own arts education.  As the story goes, finding a studio was incredibly difficult for the women, as landlords were ambivalent to rent space to them because they couldn’t understand why a group of women needed a space to do “work.” Chicago’s program at Fresno only lasted one year, since she was hired to co direct the Feminist Art Program at the California Institute of the Arts.

In related news, the Health Care Reform Bill was passed yesterday. Unfortunately the House included an amendment which would ban federal funding of abortion in the public option. This is lame and incredibly upsetting. If you are also upset by this decision, voice your opinion by sending a message to the President here: http://www.ppaction.org/campaign/hcr09bse_af?rk=g7z2JR1q7qDyE

In other maybe sort of not really related news, Miss Marissa (aka my fabulous roommate) has established a new blog that focuses on the San Francisco art scene, her favorite films, and photos that she takes around the city. I love it so far, you should check it out: http://artinthefog.wordpress.com/

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I love Los Angeles. I love Hollywood. They’re beautiful. Everybody’s plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic.– Andy Warhol

Now, now. I really do like LA. I love the energy, the history, and just the overall punk rock feeling mixed with the uber corporate. The best of both worlds really, but also an incredibly strange place. Very ugly beautiful, but the other way around, I guess. Beautiful ugly?

Enough of my rambling! There is a point to this entry, I promise.

It’s the beginning of June. The beginning of Summer. And when I think of summer, I think of travel and trips on the metrolink to LA, because I did a lot of that last year. Whether it was to visit friends who live there or to see shows, LA will always be associated with summer and good friends for me.

So! This summer there are a lot of cool exhibits and museums that I need to check out. You should too! Here are my top three that I need to see (like that rhyme?):

Classical Frieze: Eleanor Antin at LACMA

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Remember a long time ago when I went to see WACK at the Geffen Contemporary? And how I went on and on about how much I love Eleanor Antin? Well, to reiterate, I think the lady is pretty great. I want to see her newer work and how she has evolved as an artist and great thinker.

The Darker Side of Light: Arts of Privacy, 1850-1900 at the Hammer Museum

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The museum website describes this exhibit as the hidden art from this time; the seedy underbelly, if you will. Focusing mostly on works from France and Germany, these pieces present a darker side of the Impressionist era.  I’ve never been to the Hammer Museum. I remember last year they were showing Kara Walker’s work and I missed out! I will not miss this.

Craft and Folk Art Museum

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Their tagline explains “because a shrinking world requires an expanded mind.” YES! I agree, CaFAM! Their exhibit Celestial Ash looks neat. Their other current exhibit doesn’t sound all that exciting to me. I’m interested in seeing their permanent collection. I can’t believe this museum is right across the street from LACMA and I’ve never noticed it! I stumbled upon this site today. I’ll keep you posted when I visit. Admission is $5 for general public. Not too shabby!

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Uptown Underground: OC

by tatiana on October 15, 2008

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I heard about this public installation through a friend. It sounded intriguing… outdoor video installation about dancing, and a DJ providing the soundtrack.

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So a bunch of us went, and 5 out of 6 were not disappointed. I was one of the 5. This piece was displayed outside of Segerstrom Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, California. We parked (we found a way to park without paying… don’t tell anyone), walked over and I was surprised to see so many people. And bleachers! Like a classy football game. :o) It was really cool to see so many people gather to view such a beautiful installation.

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The piece was titled Slow Dancing by David Michalek and the video was projected onto the side of the building. The visuals in junction with the masterful mixing of KCRW’s DJ Jason Bentley made for a wonderful treat for the eyes and ears. And my hot chocolate was pretty good too.

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I haven’t been this fascinated by the human body since I went to see the Body Worlds exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago 4 years ago. It was fascinating to watch the tiny ripples move across the dancers’ clothing like water.

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ARE YOU KIDDING ME?

So says the critic Brian Sewell, and the art market seems to agree, with men’s work commanding millions more at auction. By Andrew Johnson

I think Sarah Thronton made the best point in this article when she explained, “You cannot equate the monetary value of art with the aesthetic worth of the artist. One would expect the art world to be more egalitarian. It was only in 2004 that a living woman, Marlene Dumas, broke through the $1m barrier. At the top end of the market, the people who can afford to spend a lot are entrepreneurial men. And they buy entrepreneurial artists – Warhol, Hirst, Koons – artists they perhaps identify with. Second, it’s about volume. Women don’t tend to have factories of assistants churning out work. If you want to boost an artist’s price you need to bring their work to auction again and again. Women don’t usually work in that way.”

If I were a multi-millionaire, I would probably buy pieces from artists I identify with as well, but I wouldn’t exclusively purchase art by women. Interesting article. Interesting to see that there remain to be ignorant people in the art world.

God I love these ladies.

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This weekend was an amazing weekend for two reasons:
1.) I went to the Getty with two of my favorite people.
and
2.) Joann’s was having an AMAZING sale on Simplicity patterns… 5 for $5! What up.

My good friend Marissa ventured down from the splendid North (Rohnert Park, CA to be exact) to hang out and bond. Marissa and I discovered a tradition that we have of always visiting museums when we spend time together. In the past we’ve visited the SF MOMA, the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art, the DeYoung Museum, and the list goes on. This time, since she flew into LAX, we hopped over to the J. Paul Getty Museum. What a perfect day. The weather was beautiful, and the museum was not at all crowded. The Getty has a handful of exhibits currently running, but here are a few that I thought were worth mentioning:

The Goat’s Dance: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide –
Cholas, White Fence, East LA, Graciela Iturbide, 1986
This exhibit showcases the photography of Graciela Iturbide, from the barrios of Los Angeles to the wide open spaces of Sonora, Mexico. She captures the in-your-face nature of the cholos and cholas from the infamous White Fence and Maravillas gangs of East LA. The subjects of her photographs are compelling and allow us a glimpse into their dynamic world.

Consuming Passion: Fragonard’s Allegories of Love –
The Fountain of Love, Fragonard, 1875
I absolutely loved these pieces, and I loved seeing the process in making pieces of such detail. The Getty provides not only the finished paintings for our viewing pleasure, but includes some original sketches and/or drafts and variations of the pieces. Very neat experience.

Alas, my Friday spent at the Getty came and went. The two hours we spent in pre-rush hour traffic back to Huntington could have been worse. I, of course, played my Shirley Temple’s Greatest Hits CD… but soon realized that I was the only one enjoying it. Needless to say, it did not help. Luckily we talked up a storm and passed the time the best we could.

Every now and then I get an itch to create an addition to my wardrobe. Usually this itch is a result of disappointing selections at clothing stores. My quest this time is to create the perfect jumper. The jumper is something I struggle with. Why? Well, for one, it can easily look like a Muumuu. And secondly it can make one look very juvenile- and being the youngest person in my workplace, looking more juvenile than I already do is not ideal. So, I have been doing some research. Luckily for me, Joann’s had an amazing sale on Simplicity patterns yesterday. I bought 10 patterns for $10! Woo woo. So here is the pattern I am using for my jumper:

Simplicity Pattern, 4097

I basically finished it last night, save for a few details that need some hand sewing, but I still feel like it looks a bit muumuu-ish. So, after perusing the good old internet I’ve found some inspiring jumpers:
Chloe
I really like this jumper by Chloe. I like the bagginess, and the way the garment is styled with the collared undershirt.
Heart Bubble Jumper Dress
I really like the way this jumper bubbles at the bottom, but not in the typical “bubble skirt” kind of way. I might utilize this technique.
Mooka Kinney
The “Maeby Jumper” by Mooka Kinney, a dress designing duo from New York. I absolutely love what they do. Totally inspiring.

I’ll keep you posted on my progress with the perfect jumper…

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