1970s

Zero Days of Summer: The Playlist

by tatiana on September 9, 2010

(Photo Credit: weheartit)

Howdy, kids! I know my last post was music-related, but here’s a lil playlist I put together today.


Get a playlist!

So, as some of you may know, summer has not quite hit San Francisco – it’s been 65 degrees and cloudy for the last 3 months. As such, I’m trying to keep the summer spirit alive (and hopefully not get too mopey with my vitamin D deficiency) in hopes that it will be warm and sweater-free soon (at least for a few weeks) with these songs that remind me of summertime. Enjoy!

{ 2 comments }

Change Clothes and Go

by tatiana on April 6, 2010

Photo Credit: Bubble Girl by Banksy

Lately, I’ve found myself to be in somewhat of a strange head space. I attribute this to not having much time to do absolutely nothing… which, honestly, I rarely do because I don’t like being “bored”, but sometimes it’s really important. As my friend Frank N. would say, “it’s all a part of the creative process.” I need to remember this. [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Thrifting in SF

by tatiana on October 4, 2009

Today my roommate and I are off to Goodwill in the Mission to scope out the furniture scene. Hopefully we’ll find something cute and comfy for our living room… but secretly I have another, more exciting quest. Faux. Fur. Coat.

1930s Fur

[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

Monday Inspiration: My Mom

by tatiana on July 20, 2009

Mom and Dad

I was sitting in the den with my parents the other day looking through old photos and I came across these from the “old days.” Above is a photo of my parents before they were married (circa 1979). Don’t I have attractive parents? I think so. (Ahem, that’s where I get it from!) Haha. Jk. I want to make a dress like the one my mom is wearing in this photo. This was a dress that she made herself! Too cute. My mom is always such a classy lady. I love how my dad seems to be presenting her like she’s a delicate porcelain doll… which is funny, because the lady is fierce (in a good way)! Don’t mess with my mom. Haha.

Mom

I love this picture of my mom at Disneyland, and I LOVE LOVE her sunglasses. So stylish! And I totally wear my hair that way. I’m more like my mom than I think…

{ 5 comments }

Wednesday Inspiration

by tatiana on June 17, 2009

robertson_1

robertson_2

‘History I’ and ‘History II’ posters by Tony Robertson (Earthworks Poster Collective),
Sydney, Australia 1977

**Scanned from Suffragettes to She-Devils: Women’s Liberation and Beyond by Liz McQuiston**

{ 0 comments }

Sometimes Size Does Not Matter

by tatiana on November 7, 2007

I’ve been wanting to see this show ever since I found out it was going to be at San Diego State. I missed that boat, but luckily for me, the show was also traveling to good ole’ Cal State Los Angeles. I’ve never been to Cal State LA, and I must say, their Luckman Arts complex is gorgeous. Me gusta mucho. I love how accessible it is from the parking structure, and how easy it is to find from the freeway. Two thumbs up from a tourist’s perspective. (Everytime I go to LA I feel like a tourist). So anyway, going on as we speak…

The Graphic Imperative: International Posters for Peace, Social Justice & the Environment, 1965-2005
Libertidad Para Angela Davis, Beltran Felix, 1971

Where?
Cal State Los Angeles
Luckman Gallery
5151 State University Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90032-8116
(323) 343-6604

When?
October 27-December 15, 2007
Gallery Hours: Mon-Thurs. and Sat. 12-5pm

How much?
FREE, except for the dollar that you’ll pay for parking… which is a bargain for parking in LA.

I STILL don’t get it.
What initially drew me to this exhibit? Two words: Guerilla Girls! I love seeing their pieces at different exhibits. They’re so inspiring, I would never pass up an opportunity to experience their work up close. The aura of powerful women is always palpable. I know their pieces are posters, and it’s not exactly the same as viewing a painting, because it’s not one of a kind… but I think that’s what’s so great about this exhibit, and about the graphic arts in general. Graphic art, for me, has so much cultural influence and resonates loudly irregardless of which form it takes; whether it’s a billboard, graffiti, a sticker, or in this case, a poster. It’s a piece of art that is utilized in the mainstream of everyday and in turn may be discussed outside of the political arena, making these issues everyone’s problem instead of just the government’s. It’s kind of sneaky if you think about it. We are advertising a social movement like we’re advertising a consumer good. If you capture someone’s attention, the product becomes more popular, and then more people will jump on the bandwagon. Well, that’s in the utopia for social movements in my mind, but I guess in the real world it’s a little more difficult.

The Graphic Imperative exhibits 111 posters that have served to create awareness of social issues or injustices that existed, and in turn created a discourse to try to make change happen. The exhibit includes posters from the past 40 years; four decades that were critical to many issues such as unfair labor, racism, violence against women, AIDS, the environment, and many more.

The Luckman Art Gallery at CSLA is pretty small space, but an average size for a University art gallery. Although the exhibit is small its message is anything but.

{ 0 comments }

so I could have experienced the 1960s and 1970s. All of the intense movements and changes happened then (in my opinion). From the Weathermen to Womanhouse in Los Angeles to the creation of a punk fashion culture (ahem…Vivienne Westwood). Lately it feels as if a lot of museums are showing works from that culture-shifting time period. And it makes me jealous. Don’t get me wrong, I’m proud of my generation, and the fact that I was able to participate in the ongoing third wave feminist movement (or tried to do my part, at least); I would really have liked to be at the forefront of all of that change. And I would have LOVED to see Elvis in concert. Damn.

Ok, end of the rant. But this brings me to the newest exhibit at our very own Orange County Museum of Art. I haven’t visited this museum since, oh, the John Waters: Change of Life exhibition which in my opinion was one of the best exhibits I have ever witnessed. John Waters is a hero indeed. But for the good year and a half since that show everything there has looked pretty boring, to be honest with you. Until now! ::cheers:: Opening this Sunday…

Art Since the 1960s: California Experiments

Vija Clemins, Eraser, 1967

Where?
Orange County Museum of Art
850 San Clemente Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660
When?
July 15th 2007- September 14, 2008
(Museum hours: Wed – Sun 11-5pm; Thurs 11-8pm)
How much?
Ten big ones.
I STILL don’t get it.
Well, this exhibit will highlight pieces from the museum’s permanent collection that focus on post 1960s contemporary art. What am I excited about? Of course seeing more of Eleanor Antin’s work. When I saw her Carving: A Traditional Sculpture piece at the WACK! exhibit a few months ago, I was incredibly moved. (The entire friggin exhibit was moving. It’s open for a few more days kids!!!) She makes the concept of crash-dieting over 36 days highly unglamorous and real juxtaposing the classic idea of a Greek sculptor chipping away excess marble to reveal an “inner beauty”.

I can go on forever about Antin, but there are handfuls of other artists to see at this contemporary exhibit. So go, and be sure to share your thoughts.

A Traditional Sculpture by Antin

{ 1 comment }